garden ponderings


New Lens for Phone Camera

A macro lens shows a small red succulent,
which can barely be seen in the lower part of the other photo
taken with phone camera.

With a wide angle lens,
I can photograph more than one plant at a time.
Get width to my pictures.

There is also a fish-eye lens
that I look forward to learning how I can use.
* * * * *
I composed the above post on my iphone,
then could not get it to post.
It turns out my older phone does not support
the Word Press app.
I was disappointed
I would have to start all over with my post.
The good news was
Word Press had saved my work as a draft,
so I am able to post my blog in its original state after all!

Thank you to my daughter for the gift of the lens,
and to my son for the much-needed technical assistance.
My kids are the best!


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Spring Abloom in Winter

Violets bloom all winter long here.
They look beautiful in the snow,
but no snow this year, so far.
These blossoms have naturalized in many of my beds.
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Bergenia are early bloomers here, also.
They grow on the sheltered east side of my house,
protected from deer.
* * * * *

Hellebore are also growing in a sheltered east-facing area.
The ferns came up naturally,
and keep these flowers shaded.
While the white flowers are in full bloom,
the pink ones are just beginning.
* * * * *

The first strawberry blossoms
from a warmer area in the yard.

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Very Early Spring Daffodils

Spring bulbs are emerging particularly early this year.
Not only blooming snowdrops & daffodils,
but tulip & hyacinth leaves have poked through the ground, also.

I have been gardening in this same place for over 35 years,
and this is the earliest, by a large margin,
for these flower bulbs.
Argh!  Please excuse my focus.
I should have had my glasses on!
Here the flowers look so small & insignificant.
It is a south-facing rise, a break in the trees,
a particularly sunny area.
Also a tractor & vehicle shortcut,
across a fork in the road,
which makes me think it amazing the daffodils have persevered.

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December Flowers in Paradise

There really is a town named Paradise!
In the Sierra Mountain foothills
of Northern California.
We visited friends at their new home in the sunshine.
Manzanita, a native plant, is blooming now.
*  *  *
Pineapple Sage is in my friend’s garden.
*  *  *
I saw a number of Camellias in bloom.
Where I live, further north, it will be a few more months
before I see my plant flower.
*  *  *
We think this is a Coreopsis.
Sure looks like one.
*  *  *
IMG_1669[1]I know Lavender can rebloom if cut back.
But in December?

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Thanksgiving Flower

In the past, we have always had our first frost by now.
Killing all flowers until spring.
(Save the violets, which bloom even in snow.)
But the weather is changing.

Not only the hollyhock flowers,
but the deer have left them alone.
I speculate there is so much other greenery
for the deer to browse,
they don’t need to eat my plants.
This pink-flowered plant is on
a different side of the house.

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Ontario, Canada

Visiting grandboys.
A walk around the neighborhood.
Day before Halloween.

Flowers above were growing in the drainage area next to the road
Orange flower was hard to photograph,
camera kept focusing on background.
It resembled a statice flower.
*  *  *

Cosmos, Aster and Autumn Joy are on their last legs before snow.
*  *  *

Beautiful dahlias!
*  *  *

I saw a variety of hydrangeas.
They looked pretty even after the flowers die.
*  *  *

Geraniums – saw them at multiple houses.
One lady told me she already took cuttings for next year’s flowers.
*  *  *

Lychnis and pink Candytuft.
I’ve never seen Candytuft in pink.
An older woman told me she brought the seeds from Germany,
many years ago.  It freely reseeds now.
*  *  *

It was a well-kept yard that we found the mushrooms.