susansflowers

garden ponderings


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Thoreau

I have not yet posted a quote,
though I love to read them:

I suspect that the child plucks its first flower with an insight into its beauty & significance which the subsequent botanist never retains.

Henry David Thoreau
5 February 1852
Journal 4:329

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9 Comments

New Lens for Phone Camera

A macro lens shows a small red succulent,
which can barely be seen in the lower part of the other photo
taken with phone camera.

With a wide angle lens,
I can photograph more than one plant at a time.
Get width to my pictures.

There is also a fish-eye lens
that I look forward to learning how I can use.
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I composed the above post on my iphone,
then could not get it to post.
It turns out my older phone does not support
the Word Press app.
I was disappointed
I would have to start all over with my post.
The good news was
Word Press had saved my work as a draft,
so I am able to post my blog in its original state after all!

Thank you to my daughter for the gift of the lens,
and to my son for the much-needed technical assistance.
My kids are the best!


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Shore Acres

We had a heat wave here, so escaped (about 55 miles, or 88 kilometers)
to the coast for the day.

Visited one of our favorite places, Shore Acres State Park (ShoreAcres.net)
near Coos Bay, Oregon.  Beautiful gardens and beach coves.

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First pictured is a bed of roses.
Next is one of dahlias with rudebekia in the corners.
I love the purple salvia inside a border of boxwood,
A bed of zinnias and snapdragons finish above photos.
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I saw a few varieties of hydrangea.

And noticed how one escaped to live on the cliff.

The path to the beach ran above this part of the cliff,
with the formal, fenced gardens on the other side of the path.
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In the Japanese Garden, I saw this beautiful, pastel fuchia shrub.
The sedge looks so much like the papyrus in my own garden, but much taller.
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Both of these roses smelled so enticing.
For me, that would be a criteria to get any rose award.
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Shore Acres is the middle State Park of three in a row.
At the south end, near Cape Arago, is an area where sea lions and other protected
animals visit during the year.
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On – Going

For all the various flowers in my garden,
some of my favorites are the ones that keep on blooming.
On and on and on.

Roses should be on the top of the list, as they love the summer sun.
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Bush with single red roses on the left shows flowers in different stages of bloom.
This plant flowers so profusely and continuously, it is near impossible to keep up with deadheading.
Mini-roses on the right are one of my most reliable steady bloomers.
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Oh, I must be losing my mind, as I cannot remember your name.
Your face, yes, but not your name. . .
Nevertheless, these two plants have been blooming continuously the last couple of months,
through the heat of summer.
Spent flowers were cut a couple of times, and they just keep on keeping on.
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My fuchsia is still small, so I almost forgot about it, but it bloomed all summer.
I need to be patient; it will fill out in time.
One of the last hollyhock blossoms at the top of its stem.
Sometimes these bloom horizontally,
as the weight of the flowers is too much to stay vertical.


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Coming On (or not Peaked, yet)

We had a very mild spring, and it seems like everything is early this year,
flowers and vegies alike.  We had a good couple of days of rain in July that made everything grow like crazy afterward, especially the grass and weeds!
No days over 100 degrees F (37.8 C) and very few days over 90 degrees F (32.2 C).
I believe the plants like this moderately hot summer.

This Rose of Sharon plant has been here but a few years, and has grown significantly in that time.  The blossoms are plentiful, but perhaps short-lived.  Have not tried it as a cut flower, but do not think that is what it is known for.
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Asters seem to be flowering so early this year.
I have yet to see the plants with pink or white-colored blossoms,
so they must start later.
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Rudebekia, or Black-eyed Susans, are all a-bloom.
I know these are great cut flowers.
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Crocosmia is in full bloom now.  It thrives in full sun and is drought-resistant.
But watch out if it gets irrigated – it multiplies rapidly has taken over a flower bed.
The baby corms take a lot of digging to eliminate from an area.


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Going, going, almost gone

There was an entire bed of artichoke flowers.
Of course, not all at once, so I was able to enjoy them for awhile.
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The outer leaves are prickly, but the inner purple part is so-o soft.
I cut and dried many of these blossoms.  The stems are quite sturdy,
thus they can dry upright.
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Last of the lilies.
These are some of my favorite summer flowers, so showy.
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I have dead-headed most of my hyssop plants, but this moth found one of the last flowers.  When the plant is in full bloom, the insects love it.
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Mexican oregano, outside my front door is part of the kitchen herb garden.
These white flowers are also, very popular with bees and moths.

The small leaves of Greek oregano are more pungent than the larger leafed Mexican variety.  I dried this type for use this winter.  Not many of the pink flowers remain.
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