susansflowers

garden ponderings


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Thanksgiving Flower

In the past, we have always had our first frost by now.
Killing all flowers until spring.
(Save the violets, which bloom even in snow.)
But the weather is changing.

Not only the hollyhock flowers,
but the deer have left them alone.
I speculate there is so much other greenery
for the deer to browse,
they don’t need to eat my plants.
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This pink-flowered plant is on
a different side of the house.

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Ontario, Canada

Visiting grandboys.
A walk around the neighborhood.
Day before Halloween.

Flowers above were growing in the drainage area next to the road
Orange flower was hard to photograph,
camera kept focusing on background.
It resembled a statice flower.
*  *  *

Cosmos, Aster and Autumn Joy are on their last legs before snow.
*  *  *

Beautiful dahlias!
*  *  *

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I saw a variety of hydrangeas.
They looked pretty even after the flowers die.
*  *  *

Geraniums – saw them at multiple houses.
One lady told me she already took cuttings for next year’s flowers.
*  *  *

Lychnis and pink Candytuft.
I’ve never seen Candytuft in pink.
An older woman told me she brought the seeds from Germany,
many years ago.  It freely reseeds now.
*  *  *

It was a well-kept yard that we found the mushrooms.


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Leaves of Change

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This Sugar Maple tree
is always the first to exhibit leaf change.
* * *

Leaves of Japanese Maples
change color over a
long time period.
* * *
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A baby Wisteria
doesn’t have many leaves
to fall!
* * *
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Rose of Sharon
is already getting a blanket
of leaves down below.
* * *
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Tree Peony leaves
on the older stems
are changing colors after
leaves on the younger stems.


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Autumn Joy

Fall has fell here.
We’ve had four days of rain.
Flowers and vegies are
starting to undergo
their seasonal changes.
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Autumn Joy sedum gives a
stellar show in the garden.
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Over time
(about a month)
the flowers change
from pale pink
to a dark maroon.
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On the far left of the photo
are some pale pink flowers.
Deer have trimmed stems outside of the fence,
and the young growth blooms as it would
earlier in the season.


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Oregon Coast

We drove along the Oregon Coast recently.
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I stood on the overlook at
Devil’s Punch Bowl and saw
these alyssum flowers on a ledge.
* * * * *
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It is pretty amazing to me
that any plant can survive,
much less thrive, living in the sand.
* * * * *
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I noticed a number of wildflowers
on the highway along the beach.
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This yellow blossom was my favorite.
It grew in clumps along the road.
* * * * *
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Queen Anne’s Lace is a prolific grower.
Can you see some of the blossoms have gone to seed?
The seed burrs are most annoying;
I have picked them out of too many socks.
* * * * *
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Everlasting Sweet Peas grow along many roadsides.
I accidentally planted them in my own flower garden.
They are near impossible to eliminate.
But they sure look pretty along the highway.
* * * * *
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Dandelions grow everywhere!


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Aster or Astor, What’s the Diff?

Variations in the spelling of American’s surnames,
leads me to wonder if these words have the same origin.
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From a discount plant at the end of summer,
this flower has become invasive here.
Okay, if I deadheaded conscientiously,
there would probably be significant number
of fewer garden additions.
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Interestingly, three colors of flowered plants have evolved.
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Rose of Sharon

A few years ago,
I asked a flower woman
what she would suggest
as a late-summer blooming shrub.
Her reply was Rose of Sharon.
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It has grown well for me
within a ‘flower jail’.
Deer nibble off any branch
that extends out of the fencing.
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This year the wind removed dead blossoms
and kept the plant looking fresh for weeks.