susansflowers

garden ponderings


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Camera Lens – Revisited

Again, I am not a photographer, merely someone who likes to take pictures.
With than disclaimer, I thought I’d show different views of the same flower bed.

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Top photo is with no zoom on the lens of my Nikon Coolpix L620
(whatever that means!).
In the middle photo, the picture is zoomed in half way.
At the bottom picture, the zoom is all the way.
I stood in the same place for all three photos.

Personally, I like the last picture, as you can get a good view of two particular flowers.
Garlic chives bear white flowers, and the pink ones are an unnamed succulent.
While the chives flowers are pretty, imho, they are getting a bit invasive.
I will have to decide who stays and who goes during this winter’s garden rearrangement.

The middle photo is not bad, you get to see the mish-mash of plants in this bed.
I find myself studying my beds in the summertime,
trying to decide how the plants can be moved to show better next summer.


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New Lens for Phone Camera

A macro lens shows a small red succulent,
which can barely be seen in the lower part of the other photo
taken with phone camera.

With a wide angle lens,
I can photograph more than one plant at a time.
Get width to my pictures.

There is also a fish-eye lens
that I look forward to learning how I can use.
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I composed the above post on my iphone,
then could not get it to post.
It turns out my older phone does not support
the Word Press app.
I was disappointed
I would have to start all over with my post.
The good news was
Word Press had saved my work as a draft,
so I am able to post my blog in its original state after all!

Thank you to my daughter for the gift of the lens,
and to my son for the much-needed technical assistance.
My kids are the best!


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Dried Flower Blossoms

A couple of peonies and an artichoke flower photographed in a vase
with a turtle-shape opening.
The same wood-fired vase appears quite different from opposite sides.

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Lavender flowers have long been dried to preserve the scent year-round.
My mini-vases display the unopened buds from lavender tops.

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What a fine discovery, on my part, to learn these tiny succulent blossoms
dry to be enjoyed all year long.


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A Yammering of Yellow

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I’ve been watching these St. John’s Wort buds the last couple of days, and this morning the flowers burst open.  I’ve never noticed the orange-tipped stamen before, so pretty.
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These wildflowers appeared a year ago at the back of a bed.  Since they were in a good location, I let them stay.  So far, they have stayed put, and not invaded the cultivated flowerbed.
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The first succulent of mine to bloom.  Tiny flowers on stems about 3″ (8cm).
Last year, I cut a small bouquet of these blossoms and kept them through the winter, in my kitchen windowsill, as dried flowers in a mini-vase.
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Earlier this spring, I was sure this Lady’s Mantle had died.  It may have outgrown its location, so I shoveled part of the plant out.  The interesting shape of its leaves and hardiness make this a keeper in my garden.
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Alliums are known to be robust members of any garden, and these yellow-flowered ones do not fail.  Mine have been neglected, separated and moved around by me and who-knows-what critters.
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The first bud of a prolific mini-flower rose bush.
You can see additional buds surrounding this blossom.
I am able to cut flowers from this plant all summer long.


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Christmas Cactus

I picked up starts for Christmas Cactus a number of years ago from a friend.  A start is merely a ‘leaf’ from a plant.  Not knowing anything about these, but that I coveted such a pretty flowering plant, I acquired ‘leaves’ from 4 separate and different colored flowering specimens.  Needless to say, not all survived.  But the ones that did take root have given me great joy, as they flower in the early winter when everything outdoors has ‘given up the ghost’ for the season here in the Pacific Northwest.

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This sturdy plant hangs in a southwest facing room at the back of the house.  Yes, I forget to water it sometimes, specially when I get busy outdoors in the warm season.  Then I remember that this is a succulent and doesn’t mind drying out between waterings – as long as I don’t let it dry out too much!  It does not want to be forgotten, just like the rest of us.

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A teeny-tiny bathroom is the home of this beauty.  It was a challenge to photograph because there was so little room to move, and the incoming daylight was difficult to adjust for.  I lowered the shade, but there is still strange colored light.  This plant has definitely found its home.  Its funny (to me) how similar plants fare so differently in various exposures, like in windowsills around the house.

Yellow Succulent Flowers

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Yellow Succulent Flowers

I have a half dozen succulent plants along the front border of a long bed next to the driveway. Sure do wish I knew their names, but I believe that most are probably in the sedum family.

About five years ago, I visited a local art festival on the last day near closing time and saw an older woman selling succulent plants. While chatting with her, I learned that she had sold plants at art festivals for many years, but now she was retiring and this was her last show. She assured me the particular plants I was looking at would grow year-round out-of-doors, as they flourished in her very Northern California yard. Did I get lucky that day!? I would give a number of plants a new home, and start learning about growing succulents.

This is the first one to bloom. The spikes of yellow flowers are about three inches high, and are a beautiful cut flower in a very small, or mini, vase.  There is a photo of these flowers in a wood-fired mini-vase posted on www.facebook.com/SusanRodenPottery