susansflowers

garden ponderings


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Rockin’ Roses

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A ‘single’ rose means there are only five petals.  Their beauty is fleeting, they do not last long on the bush.  When the shrub is full of flowers it is quite a sight.  Then there is lots of deadheading, to encourage more blooms.
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This small bush is a prolific producer of miniature roses
One of my favorites, sturdy and stalwart.
Again, lots of deadheading to keep it blooming & looking great.
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Our most aromatic rose bush, which is why my husband had to buy this one.
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Vi’s Violet is another miniature rose bush.
(I happened to find a broken name tag below.)
This plant struggles, but stays alive.  It gives a few blooms every year.
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This poor plant had been struggling for a couple of years, and almost did not make it through the winter.  I dug out chives that were threatening to overrun at the base, and dug in bark mulch and added more topsoil.
It looks so much better this year.  A climbing bush that bears miniature red blossoms, this had been one of the most productive roses here.  It now looks to be on the way back to its former glory.

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Balloon Flower

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Balloon Flower

I planted this a number of years ago, and was sure it disappeared soon after. Surprisingly, it has survived and lives in the shade and moisture under a Camellia bush. The blue-violet flowers grow on stalks that emanate away from the balloon plant, thus they appear to be growing in the leaves of nearby winter-blooming violets.

Violets grow profusely under the camellia bush, making it hard to see any other plants that might also be growing there.  Besides the balloon flower, I am now discovering various other plants popping up under the camellia including a bergenia and bluebells.  I know I have not planted the latter two in that area, so I am thinking the mice (or voles) have been moving bulbs and parts of plants around in the winter time.  I had heard that this could happen, and now I am observing plants in places that I have no other explanation for their location.

Hebe

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Hebe

I learned from one of my favorite nurseries, Siskiyou Rare Plant Nursery in Talent, OR, that this is a more unusual specimen of a large family of perennial plants.  There was a full-grown example of this plant at the nursery that sold me on it.

More often one will see small leaves on more compact plants, and this shrub is an exception in that it has larger leaves growing on loose stems of 2′ – 3′ long. About the size of a silver dollar, these roundish leaves remind me more of eucalyptus than a Hebe.

The flowers are not significant, and are fleeting. At the end of the stems, grow a 6″ to 10″ length of small, pretty blue-violet flowers.