susansflowers

garden ponderings


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Last Hurrahs

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Leaves on the Sweet Gum tree (above left) are just turning from green to yellow, while the Sugar Maple (on the right) has lost most of its leaves.
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Why would the leaves on one of three Aspen trees still be hanging on, when the other two trees are almost naked?

There are no flowers around the house.  Between the drought and global warming, I should be able to find some plant that will flower later in the season.  Driving today, I did spot nasturtiums in a neighbor’s yard.  Those I know I can grow – and they come with the bonus attribute of being edible besides pretty and late-growing.
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Down in the garden, it is another story.
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Dill (left) and Cilantro (right) flowers are staying handsome.  I think it is the perfect balance between enough sun to keep them happy, but cooler days of less daylight keep both of these plants from ‘going to seed’.
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Copy of DSCN4155 Copy of DSCN4157Cherry tomato and jalapeno flowers are in for disappointment, there is no chance they will grow to maturity before winter sets in.  Just not enough heat-hours left in this season.
Strawberries, also, keep blooming, and their fruit is much quicker to ripen, so I have a chance to harvest more of them – hoorah!


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A Good Idea

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The good news is we have lots of birds here, the bad news is that they love strawberries.  For a few years now, we have netted the berries which improved the yield.  But the stakes were putting large holes in the bird netting.  This year we got the idea of cutting holes in old tennis balls to soften the top of the stakes, and save our nets.
It seems like a good idea, we will know at the end of the season just how great this plan turned out to be.

Now we still have challenges to the berry crop from ground pests.
But one challenge at a time.

The Ubiquitous Mystery Flower

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The Ubiquitous Mystery Flower

This groundcover is creeping its way through my flower garden. I must have brought it in at some time in the far past, because I would see it in the fields if it came in via the birds.

The upside is that it does cover the ground easily and has a pretty flower. If it rains during the dry season (summer) this plant will get a second life and expand that much more. On the down side, it is very hard to stop this plant. The runners root easily, and imbed themselves in the hardest clay soil (which is plentiful here). It has choked out other more desirable groundcovers and small plants, including violets and strawberries.

For the life of me, I cannot find the name of this groundcover. If anyone can help me out, I am indebted.