susansflowers

garden ponderings


4 Comments

Red & White (no Blue today!)

Copy of DSCN3412
Five years ago, I talked a reluctant plant owner into letting me take a few starts of red Crocosmia.
I had this wild idea that they would look good next to white Shasta daisies, since both flowers bloom about the same time.
Unfortunately, I planted them in an unfenced area with no irrigation, so they were at the mercy of all of nature.

These scarlet blossoms are a real treat, as I thought the deer had eaten all my starts years ago.  You never know when a plant will surprise you and come back to life!


2 Comments

Moving Day for Foxglove, Lamb’s Ear & Lavender

Shastas, lambs ear, lavender ??????????

Today was a sunny fall day, the ground has been thoroughly moistened by rain, but it is still firm to walk on.  A perfect day for transplanting.

First off, I moved some Lambs Ear a great, drought-resistant ground cover.   Next, I put some Lavender plants in to complete a row along side the driveway.  In the lower right of the first photo, you can see a slim transplanted Lavender.  This particular bed now has Lavender, then Lambs Ear, then Shasta Daisies, and on the outside are Irises.  All of these plants are deer-resistant, thus there is no fence around them.  An Oregon Grape shrub (not pictured) in the middle, is deer fenced, even though it is supposedly deer-resistant.  My plan is to keep the Oregon Grape fenced until it is tall enough to withstand the deer nibbling.

Now to the Foxglove.  There was one plant within the deer fence and on irrigation.  It put out an enormous amount of babies.  I counted planting 76 of them.  While I dug the Foxglove from within the deer fenced flower bed, I also dug up a number of Asters that had grown up in places I did not want them.  Many of the rooted Aster starts are now in small pots to give away, but I cannot begin to keep up with them.  The Foxglove was planted along the outside of a fenced flower bed.  The second photo shows a few Foxgloves (I count eight) as they were planted.  There are at least five plantings similar to this, besides other individual plantings. They should look very nice from the front deck by next summer.  I am now learning to keep my flowers deadheaded to prevent an over abundance of progeny.  Should I call it birth-control for perennials?

Chamomile

Leave a comment

Chamomile

The flowers are really quite small, but looking at this photo, they bear a strong resemblance to Shasta and field daisies.
On the other hand, the leaves are very different. They are very fine toothed and soft, as though to invite being petted.

This perennial grows close to the ground most of the year, only gaining height when it flowers. I read that one wants to collect the flowers for chamomile tea. Will put that on my to-do list today. I remember telling my children that Peter Rabbit’s mother made him chamomile tea when he had a tummy ache. They readily agreed to try that cure when needed.