susansflowers

garden ponderings


2 Comments

New Year Snow, It is Beautiful

We awoke to snow falling, what a way to start the new year!
I measured 4″ (10 cm).The violets are always such a pleasant surprise to me.

* * * * *
img_07601
The snow looked especially pretty on this Contorted Filbert bush (aka:  Harry Lauder’s Walking Stick or Corkscrew Hazel) and the bricks.
The snow shows up the deer fence, including the fence behind on the ground,
which protects plants growing on the embankment behind.
Under the behind fences are thriving California poppies and struggling daylilies.

* * * * *

The snow was quite wet and many plants were drooping from the weight of the snow.
I got a broom and walked around the house, knocking snow off branches.
Here are before and after photos of my Rosemary bush,
she is much happier after snow removal.

* * * * *
img_07621
There are two rhododendron bushes in this photo.
I keep pruning the one on the left, as it grows prolifically.
The specimen on the right has its growth eternally challenged.
Many years ago, our dog’s favorite place to lay was under this particular bush,
but that dog has been gone over 10 years, and the plant has not really bounced back.
I made sure to brush snow from its branches to give it every chance I can.

Advertisements


1 Comment

Springing Spring ?!

We have had glorious weather:  some rain, some clouds and some sun.
Rain alleviates any thoughts of irrigation, clouds encourage the flowers to stay around much longer than usual, and the sun,
well the sun encourages everything to bloom and grow!

The first rhodies are blooming, and my one azalea is so covered with flowers
that is all you can see of it.

* * * * *

Even though I cut rhubarb flowers, it keeps putting out more of them.
At least, they are unusual looking.
Blueberry and strawberry plants are booming with flowers.  We can only hope the weather stays favorable, and the bird nets keep the pilfering in check.
Last photo above is rosemary, which I see in flower around town.
Such a sturdy and aromatic plant, how can one not love it?

* * * * *

This has been one of the best tulip years I can remember.  I like to think it is because I separated some of the larger ones and planted them all around the house.  We have enjoyed tulips out of most every window.
White lilacs open their blossoms before the lavender or purple ones do.
These are my favorites, I love the sweet scent and only wish they lasted longer indoors.


2 Comments

Rosemary

??????????Last winter I gave away a number of babies from this Rosemary plant.
Some lower limbs had rooted in the ground as new plants.

It has also been pruned severely, and may look a little sparse.
No worries, there is now plenty of space for it to fill out with new growth this summer.
Tiny, pale blue flowers complement the pleasant aroma of the needles when the plant is stroked.  Rosemary is very tough and drought resistant, give it the sunlight it craves and it will be a reliable garden beauty.

I do dry rosemary needles to use in the kitchen through the year.  A stem laid across a piece of salmon when baking, will impart a subtle scent of this herb.

Rosemary

3 Comments

Rosemary

It took a few tries to get a photo of these small flowers when the wind wasn’t moving them around. Most herbs wait until later in the season to flower, rosemary is the earliest that I know of.

Deer stay away from this plant, as they do most all aromatics. I love that feature in a plant while I am living here.

I’ve seen rosemary plants growing in all sorts of climates. My biggest surprise was when I saw a row of upright rosemary plants growing on a commercial side street in Las Vegas. These are very drought-resistant, and grow in various sizes from sprawling to a good-size shrub. A woman told me how she trained her rosemary plant in a round, not circle, shape using metal wire as a guide. I haven’t figured that out – yet. Give me a little more time.