susansflowers

garden ponderings


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Oregon Coast

We drove along the Oregon Coast recently.
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I stood on the overlook at
Devil’s Punch Bowl and saw
these alyssum flowers on a ledge.
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It is pretty amazing to me
that any plant can survive,
much less thrive, living in the sand.
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I noticed a number of wildflowers
on the highway along the beach.
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This yellow blossom was my favorite.
It grew in clumps along the road.
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Queen Anne’s Lace is a prolific grower.
Can you see some of the blossoms have gone to seed?
The seed burrs are most annoying;
I have picked them out of too many socks.
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Everlasting Sweet Peas grow along many roadsides.
I accidentally planted them in my own flower garden.
They are near impossible to eliminate.
But they sure look pretty along the highway.
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Dandelions grow everywhere!

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Very South Germany

We drove into Germany from Switzerland and found a field of tulips.

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People stopped their car to pick a few blooms.
There were indications that the flowers had been for sale,
but no more, as these were past their prime.
Nevertheless it was still a beautiful sight.

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Next day we visited Rhein Falls between Germany and Switzerland.
A short walk upstream is a bridge to the other side of the river.
There is lots to see, and the waterfalls were really cool.
Here are some beautiful May flowers we saw near the castle on the Swiss side.

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Our last morning in Germany, I found Botanical Gardens in the university town of Frieburg.  Unable to read German, it was not until we were leaving that I learned I could not visit the greenhouses inside, because it was a holiday.
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But there was much to see outside, including giant potted plants that would not live outdoors year-round.

 

There were a number of ponds of waterlilies – exquisite!

 

The azaleas were about finished blooming, and not photogenic,
but the peonies were still at their prime.
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