susansflowers

garden ponderings

Wild Iris

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Wild Iris

While these wild iris flowers bear a strong resemblance to Japanese iris, they are different, not as tall for one.
The wild iris can often be seen growing along a country road locally, but are not seen as frequently as in the past. I blame the poison that is sprayed on the roadside to control weeds. What is sprayed cannot differentiate between weeds and wildflowers, so both perish.

These iris are also found on hillsides that are not mowed and no domestic animals graze there, so our place qualifies there. They still need the right amount of moisture in the spring for them to bloom and thrive. Most often they are purple and white, as pictured. Lavender and, rarely, pink are the other colors they come in. These are also some of the largest wildflowers I’ve seen. Not tiny like the blue, pink and white gems that are so hard to photograph clearly.

Years ago I would see large drifts of these flowers. Now I look hard to spot a few specimens here or there. Damn, I’m showing my age and how long I’ve lived in the same place.

Spring Groundcover

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Spring Groundcover

This is the first photo from the new camera to be posted. I know I would not have been able to get a photo at dusk with the old camera. I am still learning the new camera, even though it has many similarities with the old one, a different manufacturer. The resolution may be too much, and take too long to download, if anyone notices this please notify me.

Wish I knew the name of this groundcover. It usually dies out in the summer, but I think it is because of its location. Next to the house gets very hot in the summertime, even with irrigation. It was given to me many years ago by an elderly neighbor, who shared many plants from her garden before she died.

The darker purple color and broad leaf is from a fading hyacinth.

Mystery Flower

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Mystery Flower

I wish I knew the name of these flowers.
They bloom very early, about the same time as crocus – except I see them in between the violets. The more recent blooms are more purple, while they fade to a paler lavender color as they age.

I thought I planted a handful of small bulbs a few years ago, now they are coming up all around a particular area. Are the small animals spreading them? Or is it the birds? Could they have gone to seed as many of my flowers do? But bulbs don’t spread by going to seed. I suppose I could dig one up to determine if they truly are bulbs. But I think I like them as they are, so they will stay and keep the violets company.

Anemone

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??????????????????????I spotted this gem while walking around the house on a warm overcast day.  A perfect day for flowers, as they love the spring heat (in the low 60’s), without direct sunlight.  The flowers last so much longer without much sun, and if it gets hot, the flowers are gone quickly.  Just another reason why I like the moist Oregon weather we get here.

I love these flowers and their delicate green leaves. When I spot the leaves each spring, I know to leave that area alone, as I don’t want to jeopardize these beautiful blooms. I’ve had them in shades of white, purple, red and combinations of those colors. They are short lived in my area, possibly because they come up between rain storms that tend to flatten them to the ground.

In the photo, there are many other bulbs coming up around the anemone. While part of me wants to divide and multiply, the cautious part of me says to leave well enough alone.

I think these bulbs have been here a very long time. Anemones have been in other flower beds, even beds that were not deer-fenced. We didn’t use to have as many resident deer as we do now (the fir trees we planted 30 years ago are now a forest), so I think a number of flowers escaped predation by melding into what little landscaping there was. Perhaps it was there were more people around in the daytime to deter the deer, as I was raising children years ago.