susansflowers

garden ponderings


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Ontario, Canada

Visiting grandboys.
A walk around the neighborhood.
Day before Halloween.

Flowers above were growing in the drainage area next to the road
Orange flower was hard to photograph,
camera kept focusing on background.
It resembled a statice flower.
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Cosmos, Aster and Autumn Joy are on their last legs before snow.
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Beautiful dahlias!
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I saw a variety of hydrangeas.
They looked pretty even after the flowers die.
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Geraniums – saw them at multiple houses.
One lady told me she already took cuttings for next year’s flowers.
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Lychnis and pink Candytuft.
I’ve never seen Candytuft in pink.
An older woman told me she brought the seeds from Germany,
many years ago.  It freely reseeds now.
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It was a well-kept yard that we found the mushrooms.

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Last Gasp?

We’ve had a lot of rain, all the plants are sodden and drenched.

I was surprised to see from my kitchen window, a rose bush in bloom.
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Yes, it looked better at a distance.
A flower at this time of year, still makes my heart happy.
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A bit of sunshine on a rainy day.

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I had not realized just how hardy hydrangea flowers are.
This particular blossom is not showing signs of age.
I believe it is because temperatures are now cooler than in summer.
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Arabis and Rudbeckia are showing themselves not as rain-hardy as some other plants.


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Harmonious Hydrangea

Copy of DSCN3466This shrub produces more flowers every year!
How is that not to love about a plant?

There are many types of hydrangea, some are smaller, some larger.  Some get pruned to the base every year, others merely get dead-headed (dead flowers are cut off), to encourage flowering the next year.
These are hereditary differences.

As far as flower color, pink or blue, that depends on the ph environment of the soil in which the bush grows.

I wish I could figure out which type of hydrangea I have.
One of the two in my garden is pictured above.
The other has never bloomed.  I am reluctant to cut all the branches to the base, for fear none of the branches would return the next spring.
The two specimen that I have were acquired at different times from very different places, they both get a lot of sun exposure and their local ground has been enriched.
Various hydrangea could be like relatives, they are in the same family, but even siblings are different from each other.


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First Freeze

We had our first overnight freeze and a number of plants are now dormant for the winter.  Still, the first official day of winter is not due for over a month.  Leaves of the hydrangea quickly turned a droopy brown, and those of the lilac bushes are on the ground.

But there are also trees whose leaves are not finished with their autumn show.
I present three examples I found around my house:
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First is a dwarf ginko tree, which is barely over a foot (30 mm) tall.  Daylilies keep trying to invade its ‘turf’ from the back and chamomile from the front.  The poor little ginko is so small, it cannot defend itself.
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Next is a Japanese maple that is a fairly new addition to my garden.  While my other Japanese maple tree has shed all of its leaves, this one is still trying to put out new growth.  Some of the leaves are starting to turn orange, and others are sprouting the light green of new growth.  Is this particular tree native to the Himalayas?
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Last is one of the beauties of this area, a Sweet Gum tree, from the maple family.  It grows more vertical than the sugar maple next to it, which has a classic roundish leaf area.  The sugar maple gets its leaves long before the sweet gum in the spring, but the sweet gum hangs onto its leaves longer in the autumn.


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Aunt Ann’s Hydrangea

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This small plant has but one flower, and it looks magnificent.  For a plant that probably was not intended to be planted, much less survive for any length of time, that is a feat.

A few years ago, when my Aunt Ann passed away, someone gave a couple of hydrangea plants as decorations at her wake.  They are not native to, nor can I remotely believe they would live outdoors in a hot desert climate where her home was.  Therefore, I brought one home with me on the airplane (does this fact make her death prior to 9/11?).  I planted it, and it took a few years for any new growth to appear.  Now it flowers, and I get to be reminded of good times with my Aunt Ann.

There is much I can say regarding things I’ve learned about growing hydrangeas.  And so much more I can say about Aunt Ann, where I spent many summers playing with my cousins, and tidbits I learned from my Aunt.  My mind is remembering so many good times, this is all for today.

Another Mystery Plant

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Another Mystery Plant

While I am on this mystery plant theme, I have another one. This is a more recent addition to the flower garden, and I just misplaced the name tag. Perhaps I planted it and thought it died, when it was slow in getting established.

The flowers do not resemble regular flowers, as they are green. But it is definitely interesting looking.

I have no idea how bit it might grow – which could be important later, as it is near a hydrangea. I’ve moved so many plants – just add it to the list of winter gardening projects. Yes, we do get some snow most winters. But we also get a warm week in January or so, most years. If I’m around, it is a very busy week in the yard.