susansflowers

garden ponderings


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Red & White (no Blue today!)

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Five years ago, I talked a reluctant plant owner into letting me take a few starts of red Crocosmia.
I had this wild idea that they would look good next to white Shasta daisies, since both flowers bloom about the same time.
Unfortunately, I planted them in an unfenced area with no irrigation, so they were at the mercy of all of nature.

These scarlet blossoms are a real treat, as I thought the deer had eaten all my starts years ago.  You never know when a plant will surprise you and come back to life!


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Wonderous Whites

White flowers are essential for every garden, because they go with every color in a bouquet.  There is even a plant nursery (in Connecticut, USA) that took the name White Flower Farm.
* * * * * Copy of DSCN3172 Last winter, I moved this Salvia, and it is looking better than ever. The flowers are staying a long time, which is a definite plus.
* * * * * Copy of DSCN3270 The daisy-like flowers are what one would steep for a cup of Chamomile tea.  Personally, I like this plant for the evergreen, delicate foliage.
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My honeysuckle has had the same home for so long the vine now covers a fence.  Its blooms continuously, so there are always flowers in various stages.  When the wind is blowing just right, you can pick up the delicate scent from away.
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Ah, the field daisies!  They look fabulous in a meadow.
When my son was at home, and mowed the fields for us, he learned to mow around the field daisies, just because I liked them.
In the last couple of years, they have tried to make a home in my flower gardens.  At first, I thought it was a treat, but all too soon, they took over.  After blooming, they get ratty and mangy looking.  This year, I am digging and digging and more digging to get them out of the cultivated area.
Will I ever learn?


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Moving Day for Foxglove, Lamb’s Ear & Lavender

Shastas, lambs ear, lavender ??????????

Today was a sunny fall day, the ground has been thoroughly moistened by rain, but it is still firm to walk on.  A perfect day for transplanting.

First off, I moved some Lambs Ear a great, drought-resistant ground cover.   Next, I put some Lavender plants in to complete a row along side the driveway.  In the lower right of the first photo, you can see a slim transplanted Lavender.  This particular bed now has Lavender, then Lambs Ear, then Shasta Daisies, and on the outside are Irises.  All of these plants are deer-resistant, thus there is no fence around them.  An Oregon Grape shrub (not pictured) in the middle, is deer fenced, even though it is supposedly deer-resistant.  My plan is to keep the Oregon Grape fenced until it is tall enough to withstand the deer nibbling.

Now to the Foxglove.  There was one plant within the deer fence and on irrigation.  It put out an enormous amount of babies.  I counted planting 76 of them.  While I dug the Foxglove from within the deer fenced flower bed, I also dug up a number of Asters that had grown up in places I did not want them.  Many of the rooted Aster starts are now in small pots to give away, but I cannot begin to keep up with them.  The Foxglove was planted along the outside of a fenced flower bed.  The second photo shows a few Foxgloves (I count eight) as they were planted.  There are at least five plantings similar to this, besides other individual plantings. They should look very nice from the front deck by next summer.  I am now learning to keep my flowers deadheaded to prevent an over abundance of progeny.  Should I call it birth-control for perennials?


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Shasta Daisies

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Shasta Daisies ring half of the flower garden area around my house.  Because the deer do not bother these flowers.  Usually deer-resistant plants are fuzzy, aromatic or gray-leaved, and Shasta Daisies have none of these features, so I have not figured out why the deer avoid them.  Another benefit to growing these daisies is they are drought-resistant.  Not quite like a cactus, but definitely do not need pampering.

I am including a photo of an arrangement of Shasta Daisies with accents of sprigs of lavender.  As the daisy flowers are coming into full bloom, the lavenders are starting to fade.  Thus a natural bouquet is so much a matter of timing. 

The flowers are standing in a Goddess Vase that I made.  Do you see the female figure in the pottery vase?  They are modeled on archaeological figurines that have been found throughout Southern and Eastern Europe, around Iberia to Scotland, and dated 20,000 to 30,000 years ago.  The original sculptures were usually small, with no head, just a torso.  They are often full-figured.  It is speculated the pregnant female body was being honored, as that ensured the future of humans.  This was long before the advent of agriculture, which emerged around 10,000 years ago.

Chamomile

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Chamomile

The flowers are really quite small, but looking at this photo, they bear a strong resemblance to Shasta and field daisies.
On the other hand, the leaves are very different. They are very fine toothed and soft, as though to invite being petted.

This perennial grows close to the ground most of the year, only gaining height when it flowers. I read that one wants to collect the flowers for chamomile tea. Will put that on my to-do list today. I remember telling my children that Peter Rabbit’s mother made him chamomile tea when he had a tummy ache. They readily agreed to try that cure when needed.

Field of Wild Daisies

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Field of Wild Daisies

The photo was taken in the late afternoon when you can see the field is mostly shaded by tall trees. A year-round creek runs behind the oak trees in the distance.

When my son mowed the fields, I taught him to go around wild rose bushes and the wild daisies. The daisy patches have grown since we don’t mow the entire field anymore.