susansflowers

garden ponderings


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Coming On (or not Peaked, yet)

We had a very mild spring, and it seems like everything is early this year,
flowers and vegies alike.  We had a good couple of days of rain in July that made everything grow like crazy afterward, especially the grass and weeds!
No days over 100 degrees F (37.8 C) and very few days over 90 degrees F (32.2 C).
I believe the plants like this moderately hot summer.

This Rose of Sharon plant has been here but a few years, and has grown significantly in that time.  The blossoms are plentiful, but perhaps short-lived.  Have not tried it as a cut flower, but do not think that is what it is known for.
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Asters seem to be flowering so early this year.
I have yet to see the plants with pink or white-colored blossoms,
so they must start later.
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Rudebekia, or Black-eyed Susans, are all a-bloom.
I know these are great cut flowers.
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Crocosmia is in full bloom now.  It thrives in full sun and is drought-resistant.
But watch out if it gets irrigated – it multiplies rapidly has taken over a flower bed.
The baby corms take a lot of digging to eliminate from an area.


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Orange Crocosmia

Crocosmia aCrocosmia c

My first set of bulbs for these crocosmia were given to me by one of the people who built my house over 30 years ago.  They were growing in his mother’s yard, she had passed away, and the house had just been sold.  For me, I have found that flower and plant starts, not from a nursery, can come with an interesting story.  When I see the plant in my yard, it brings back memories of where it came from and more.

These are sturdy little bulbs, that can really multiply if left undisturbed for a few years.  When I think I have dug them out from a flower bed, I see escaped bulblets growing for years to come. 

Normally my crocosmia thrive when they are protected from deer, but I have them growing in all sorts of places.  There is one unfenced bed containing crocosmia growing wild with lemon balm, on a hill away from the regular deer paths.  Bearded iris and artemisia are also on guard – 3 out of 4 plants that our deer don’t eat, seems to save the crocosmia.