susansflowers

garden ponderings


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Porcelain Lilies

Besides growing flowers, I am also a clay artist and potter.
Today, I made calla lilies of colored porcelain clay.

DSCN4641

The flowers are small, about an inch long (not including stem).

This is a new item for me, I am not sure how the colors will look after being fired in my wood-fired kiln.  I’ll show you in a month, after the firing.


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Bee Balm

??????????

Maybe because this is a newer plant for me, and these are the only flowers, but I have not seen any bees around it.  I do like the feathery petals of these flowers a lot, and the bright red sure stands out in my flower garden.  It is planted between white-flowering salvia and chamomile.  Unfortunately they do not flower in the same month as their blooms would look so striking next to each other with short white flowers under the taller red bee balm.

I understand the base of this plant should spread as it stays in one place, and I look forward to seeing that.  It will take a bit of nurturing since this flower bed is on shale and clay with redwood trees growing behind.  If you didn’t already know, the roots of redwood trees go sideways for a very long ways, and not much grows in their shadow.  I just keep adding amendments to lighten the ‘soil’ and keep raising the bed for the flowers.  Don’t know how long I can pull this off, but for now, it works.

The Ubiquitous Mystery Flower

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The Ubiquitous Mystery Flower

This groundcover is creeping its way through my flower garden. I must have brought it in at some time in the far past, because I would see it in the fields if it came in via the birds.

The upside is that it does cover the ground easily and has a pretty flower. If it rains during the dry season (summer) this plant will get a second life and expand that much more. On the down side, it is very hard to stop this plant. The runners root easily, and imbed themselves in the hardest clay soil (which is plentiful here). It has choked out other more desirable groundcovers and small plants, including violets and strawberries.

For the life of me, I cannot find the name of this groundcover. If anyone can help me out, I am indebted.