susansflowers

garden ponderings


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Promises, Promises

If there is anything a wet spring has to offer
is the promise of blooms to come.

Even though the rhododendron bud appears dark pink,
its flower is pale pink.
Upper right corner is a yellow geum bud.
Great expectations of gorgeous (imho) white Dutch iris.
* * * * *

Yarrow, Rugosa and a dwarf Ginko.
* * * * *

Daylilies, foxglove and
California poppies which refuse to open in the rain.
* * * * *

Droopy flower buds are a trademark of poppies.
Chives and peonies follow in the row.
* * * * *
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A botanical oddity:  Rudbekia trying to bloom way out of season.
Black-eye Susans are fall-bloomers, and this flower did not get the genetic message!


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Camera Lens – Revisited

Again, I am not a photographer, merely someone who likes to take pictures.
With than disclaimer, I thought I’d show different views of the same flower bed.

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Top photo is with no zoom on the lens of my Nikon Coolpix L620
(whatever that means!).
In the middle photo, the picture is zoomed in half way.
At the bottom picture, the zoom is all the way.
I stood in the same place for all three photos.

Personally, I like the last picture, as you can get a good view of two particular flowers.
Garlic chives bear white flowers, and the pink ones are an unnamed succulent.
While the chives flowers are pretty, imho, they are getting a bit invasive.
I will have to decide who stays and who goes during this winter’s garden rearrangement.

The middle photo is not bad, you get to see the mish-mash of plants in this bed.
I find myself studying my beds in the summertime,
trying to decide how the plants can be moved to show better next summer.


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Blooming Herbs

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French cooking thyme & onion (not garlic) chives.

Trying desperately to get the vegetable garden planted by the end of May.
The beds are tilled up, tomorrow morning they will get raked smooth, then the watering system can get hooked up.
I’ve been saving vegetable and flower seeds for many years, in zip-close bags in the refrigerator.
My plan for this year is to plant all the seeds I can – they won’t save forever.
Will keep you posted on my latest grand idea 🙂


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Home Again

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We came home to thigh-high grass in the fields and the back yard.  I am so looking forward to planting my vegetable garden.  So much to do . . . .

The flowers are blooming, it is always interesting to see which ones are doing great, and who is faltering.  In the top photo, small, pink Armeria fronts pale pink chive blossoms, yellow day-lilies in the back.  Dark purple Dutch iris on the side.  Bottom shot is a Foxglove with bearded iris, and a California poppy in the background.
We arrived home in a slight drizzle, but the ground is hard, so it is time for the irrigation to be set up.

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The alliums have multiplied, look great and will keep the deer from this bed (for awhile, at least).
I don’t know if it is the weather, or the fact I finally weeded around these iris, but this is the best they have looked ever!

On another positive note, our sugar maple tree leafed out while we were gone.  We really thought it had given up the ghost and was a goner, it should have come back to life before we left.  We must be getting old and totally mis-judged when it springs back to life.


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Garlic Chives

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These look and grow almost identical to onion chives.  There are a couple of differences, though.  For one, the garlic chives are blooming now, and the onion chives bloomed over a month ago.  Another difference that can be seen year round, is that garlic chive spears are flat, where the onion chives are tubular or round. 

And then there is the taste.  Ah, now there they do differ.  The taste and smell of garlic chives is distinct and will never be confused with onion chives.

These are a nice addition to the kitchen garden.  I also plant them around my roses to help deter aphids.

Chives

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Chives

I love the smell and look of chive flowers. I love all the members of the allium family. I love the smell and taste of onions. This plant is right outside my front door, in view of my kitchen window.

When people who are not gardeners (think city-folk) come to visit, I love to lead them though my herb garden and invite them to taste particular plants. When my then-two-year-old grandson visited, I did the same with him, but quickly learned my mistake. He naturally thought he could take any leaf and taste it. Of course, he headed right toward a large (to him) rhododendron bush – which is poisonous.

I noticed in this photo that you can see some of the different stages of chive flowers opening.  Just got lucky, this time!

I am heading toward an art show where I will display my pottery and ceramics. The chive and armeria flowers will grace some of my vases. I saw the last tulips starting to open, and I cut some peony buds, just because they are pretty that way. The lilacs are on the down side of their blooms. Day lilies and foxglove are about to open. Stock and Jacob’s ladder have so few flowers this year.