susansflowers

garden ponderings


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Ontario, Canada

Visiting grandboys.
A walk around the neighborhood.
Day before Halloween.

Flowers above were growing in the drainage area next to the road
Orange flower was hard to photograph,
camera kept focusing on background.
It resembled a statice flower.
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Cosmos, Aster and Autumn Joy are on their last legs before snow.
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Beautiful dahlias!
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I saw a variety of hydrangeas.
They looked pretty even after the flowers die.
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Geraniums – saw them at multiple houses.
One lady told me she already took cuttings for next year’s flowers.
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Lychnis and pink Candytuft.
I’ve never seen Candytuft in pink.
An older woman told me she brought the seeds from Germany,
many years ago.  It freely reseeds now.
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It was a well-kept yard that we found the mushrooms.

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Aster or Astor, What’s the Diff?

Variations in the spelling of American’s surnames,
leads me to wonder if these words have the same origin.
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From a discount plant at the end of summer,
this flower has become invasive here.
Okay, if I deadheaded conscientiously,
there would probably be significant number
of fewer garden additions.
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Interestingly, three colors of flowered plants have evolved.
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Coming On (or not Peaked, yet)

We had a very mild spring, and it seems like everything is early this year,
flowers and vegies alike.  We had a good couple of days of rain in July that made everything grow like crazy afterward, especially the grass and weeds!
No days over 100 degrees F (37.8 C) and very few days over 90 degrees F (32.2 C).
I believe the plants like this moderately hot summer.

This Rose of Sharon plant has been here but a few years, and has grown significantly in that time.  The blossoms are plentiful, but perhaps short-lived.  Have not tried it as a cut flower, but do not think that is what it is known for.
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Asters seem to be flowering so early this year.
I have yet to see the plants with pink or white-colored blossoms,
so they must start later.
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Rudebekia, or Black-eyed Susans, are all a-bloom.
I know these are great cut flowers.
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Crocosmia is in full bloom now.  It thrives in full sun and is drought-resistant.
But watch out if it gets irrigated – it multiplies rapidly has taken over a flower bed.
The baby corms take a lot of digging to eliminate from an area.


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Colorful Asters

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The original plant is this color, but the camera captures a different color than my eye sees.  I looked at a number of photos I took, and kept seeing the same hue.  In person, these flowers look more purple / blue.  I suppose there is a perfectly logical camera explanation for the color difference :-)* * * * *
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I do like this light pink color, perhaps because there are so few plants with flowers this color.  Can you see the purple asters on the far left of the photo?  The camera was fooled into showing those flowers their true color!

I am inundated with aster seedlings in the garden, since it is extremely time-consuming to dead head these plants.  New blossoms open and others die everyday, from the top of branches going down.

My latest plan is to mark the bottom of the plants with pink blooms, so I will know them after the tops have been cut off.
When they are dug up in winter, I can say decisively, what color flower comes from which plant.
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The one plant with white flowers was the last to bloom.


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Moving Day for Foxglove, Lamb’s Ear & Lavender

Shastas, lambs ear, lavender ??????????

Today was a sunny fall day, the ground has been thoroughly moistened by rain, but it is still firm to walk on.  A perfect day for transplanting.

First off, I moved some Lambs Ear a great, drought-resistant ground cover.   Next, I put some Lavender plants in to complete a row along side the driveway.  In the lower right of the first photo, you can see a slim transplanted Lavender.  This particular bed now has Lavender, then Lambs Ear, then Shasta Daisies, and on the outside are Irises.  All of these plants are deer-resistant, thus there is no fence around them.  An Oregon Grape shrub (not pictured) in the middle, is deer fenced, even though it is supposedly deer-resistant.  My plan is to keep the Oregon Grape fenced until it is tall enough to withstand the deer nibbling.

Now to the Foxglove.  There was one plant within the deer fence and on irrigation.  It put out an enormous amount of babies.  I counted planting 76 of them.  While I dug the Foxglove from within the deer fenced flower bed, I also dug up a number of Asters that had grown up in places I did not want them.  Many of the rooted Aster starts are now in small pots to give away, but I cannot begin to keep up with them.  The Foxglove was planted along the outside of a fenced flower bed.  The second photo shows a few Foxgloves (I count eight) as they were planted.  There are at least five plantings similar to this, besides other individual plantings. They should look very nice from the front deck by next summer.  I am now learning to keep my flowers deadheaded to prevent an over abundance of progeny.  Should I call it birth-control for perennials?


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White Aster

??????????

I know I already did a post about aster flowers, but the white ones just bloomed.  Have you ever noticed that the white flower of a plant blooms at a different time than the other colored flowers?  I’m thinking of irises.  The bearded ones or the Japanese Iris.  White flowers bloom either before or after the other colors.  In the case of asters, the white flowers are later.  I really cannot remember what order the various colors of irises bloom.  This will give me something (another thing) to observe next year.  I am sure there are other flowers where the white specimen flowers at a different time, and I will have to pay more attention to find another example.

There is even a nursery devoted to white flowers.  But I believe they started like that, but have come around to selling many colors of flowers.

Last night, I cut stems of three colors of asters, and put them in a mini-vase to photograph in the morning.  Well, that did not happen, as I learned (the hard way) that aster flowers are not for cutting.  This morning they had closed up as though to say their time on this earth was done.  Well, at least the blooming plants look good massed in the garden beds.


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Late Summer Flowers in Vases

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I wanted to share a late summer flower arrangement.  The goddess vase holds a late season foxglove, many asters, some spikey heather flowers and a few autumn joy sedum blossoms.  Sweet peas are in the mini-vase in front.

It is interesting to me that all of the flowers in this display are in the pink to purple hues.  Save some California poppies, that is what is blooming at this time.