susansflowers

garden ponderings


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A Cloudy Morning

An overcast morning,
so I grabbed my camera for a walk around the house.
This is some of what was in bloom:

French cooking thyme, an essential garden herb (for me).
These stock plants were rescued from a nursery.
Barely alive, they cost 25 cents, now they are thriving (yay!)
Foxglove, which neither deer nor rabbit bother, is in full bloom.
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Yellow allium flowers, a later blooming variety.
This was one of the first bulbs I planted here over 30 years ago.
It keeps coming back, no matter how much I neglect it.
One of my favorite colors of bearded iris,
this dark purple is almost black.
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Red-hot pokers start out orange then the yellow part below
grows to the top as the flower matures.
These are real hummingbird magnets!
Perennial cranesbill geraniums flower and multiply profusely.
Yellow is my early blooming color of daylily.
It is always a shot of sunshine for my disposition.

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A Yammering of Yellow

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I’ve been watching these St. John’s Wort buds the last couple of days, and this morning the flowers burst open.  I’ve never noticed the orange-tipped stamen before, so pretty.
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These wildflowers appeared a year ago at the back of a bed.  Since they were in a good location, I let them stay.  So far, they have stayed put, and not invaded the cultivated flowerbed.
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The first succulent of mine to bloom.  Tiny flowers on stems about 3″ (8cm).
Last year, I cut a small bouquet of these blossoms and kept them through the winter, in my kitchen windowsill, as dried flowers in a mini-vase.
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Earlier this spring, I was sure this Lady’s Mantle had died.  It may have outgrown its location, so I shoveled part of the plant out.  The interesting shape of its leaves and hardiness make this a keeper in my garden.
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Alliums are known to be robust members of any garden, and these yellow-flowered ones do not fail.  Mine have been neglected, separated and moved around by me and who-knows-what critters.
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The first bud of a prolific mini-flower rose bush.
You can see additional buds surrounding this blossom.
I am able to cut flowers from this plant all summer long.


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Home Again

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We came home to thigh-high grass in the fields and the back yard.  I am so looking forward to planting my vegetable garden.  So much to do . . . .

The flowers are blooming, it is always interesting to see which ones are doing great, and who is faltering.  In the top photo, small, pink Armeria fronts pale pink chive blossoms, yellow day-lilies in the back.  Dark purple Dutch iris on the side.  Bottom shot is a Foxglove with bearded iris, and a California poppy in the background.
We arrived home in a slight drizzle, but the ground is hard, so it is time for the irrigation to be set up.

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The alliums have multiplied, look great and will keep the deer from this bed (for awhile, at least).
I don’t know if it is the weather, or the fact I finally weeded around these iris, but this is the best they have looked ever!

On another positive note, our sugar maple tree leafed out while we were gone.  We really thought it had given up the ghost and was a goner, it should have come back to life before we left.  We must be getting old and totally mis-judged when it springs back to life.

Pink Alliums

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Pink Alliums

These flower bulbs were planted just this last spring. What a treat for me, that they came up and bloomed so quickly. This is a new color of allium for me, and I truly appreciate them.

I’m already thinking of places to move pink and yellow alliums when they multiply a bit more. As my garden is starting to mature, I like to think of color coordinating flower blossoms. Also, the timing flower beds for successive bloom times.  There are so many things to take into consideration besides full-grown size, as I plan to move plants around, once I learn which plants/flowers can endure my soil and water.

Wild Alliums

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Wild Alliums

These are wild alliums, and they pop up on their own, when and where they feel like it. Of course, they have decided to set up residence in the fenced areas, where the deer can not get to them. But they are deer-resisitant – don’t they know that?

I see these in the fields along with the wild daisies. Now that we are noticing areas that do not get mowed, and can be naturalized as flower meadows, I’m looking to expand the alliums as well as California poppies. Gotta get collecting seeds now.

If I was more computer adept, I could figure out how to post more than one photo at a time. I know it is possible, as I have seen it on other people’s blogs.

Alliums – yellow

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Alliums - yellow

These have been around here for a very long time. More recently, I’ve been dividing the bulbs and spreading them around to new places. The deer avoid all members of the allium – or onion – family.

With a lot of alliums, I have noticed the leaves are insignificant, but these have broader, more visible leaves, than other members of this family. The green is a strong contrast to the bright yellow flowers, and the leaves make a more full appearing bouquet on the ground with the flowers.

Allium

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Allium

This is one of the taller specimens in the allium or onion family. Last year I planted four bulbs and got four giant flowers. I was so looking forward to this year’s blooms and wondering if and when the bulbs might multiply. This is the only bloom from these bulbs this season. I wonder if the particularly cold winter we had last year could have damaged the other three bulbs? They are still there with pathetic looking leaves. Still alive, but hardly thriving.

Do you see the resemblance to the chives flowers I posted recently? The main difference is size. This flower is a good 6″ – 8″ across, while the chive blooms are just over an inch wide.